Comic Review: Huck #6

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THE 2018 FCBD HUB

Huck #6 (Image Comics)download

Mark Millar’s latest miniseries reaches the final issue of its first volume with Huck #6, with everything coming to a head for our simple hero. Like many of the other Millar books, this Rafael Albuquerque drawn series has been an extremely awesome ride, and continues to be another great addition to the “Millarassaince” that the creator has been on since Starlight.

Huck’s finally been reunited with his mother, but the catch is that the two of them are now at the mercy of the Russian scientist who created them. Of course, Huck and his mom make quick work of the Scientist and his men, and while this confrontation is over a little too quickly, it’s still great to see Huck and his mother work together to fight off their foe. Mark Millar’s script moves along at a break neck speed, but he wisely gives us some really sweet moments when Huck returns home and introduces his mother to his “good deeds list”. Huck is a great lead, and Millar works in some really charming moments for the character.

Rafael Albuquerque’s pencils have been extremely solid in this series, but he really shines in this finale. Huck’s confrontation with the man who created him is wonderfully depicted, and the layouts for the final moments of the book were great as well. Millar prides himself on working with the best artists in comics, and Albuquerque is definitely one of the best ones to work under the Millarworld banner.

Like will all Mark Millar comics, there’s talk about a Huck movie, and to be honest, if Huck does make it to the silver screen I’ll be first in line. I can definitely see a movie happening, especially after finishing this “volume one” of the story, and noticing how much Albuquerque has made Huck look like Channing Tatum. Like Starlight before it, Huck hits some surprisingly emotional beats, and nails home that some people don’t need a tragic back-story to be inspired to do good. Some people are just inherently good.